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The Emotional Health Institute (E.H.I.) is a Non-Profit Organization 501(c3), focusing on emotional health.

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  • Sue Siebens

Standing up to Erectile Dysfunction

Erectile dysfunction, is a relatively common condition, particularly in older men. But it can occur in any male past puberty, young men in their 20s and onward. It is believed that over 30 million men in the US experience erectile dysfunction. It’s hard to collect accurate numbers on its prevalence since many men will not volunteer such information during their medical check-ups. But if sales figures are telling, then $330 million was spent in 2000 on erectile dysfunction.

Erectile dysfunction can be a sign of an underlying medical issue. Physical causes of erectile dysfunction range from vascular diseases (atherosclerosis, venous insufficiency) and metabolic diseases (diabetes, hormones and renal failure), damaged nerves due to surgical procedures, injuries and neurogenic disorders (Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, MS, stroke), and medication’s side affects.

But if all the physical reasons have been ruled out, it’s time to turn to emotions and their effects on the problem.

Performance Anxiety

It is common in new relationships that a man might be eager and a little nervous about an upcoming sexual encounter and want to impress. Usually, the problem passes as partners become more comfortable with each other and in their sexual relationship.

But performance anxiety is thought to be one of the most common emotional causes of erectile dysfunction and a major component in persistent issues due to its self-perpetuating nature; performance failures lead to a belief in more inevitable performance failures. The anxiety builds in a deadly spiral of worries and self-created obstacles.

Stress

Not all causes of erectile dysfunction are directly related to sexual intercourse. When stress is a prominent force in a man’s life, it can have a significant effect on sexual performance. Issues at home, in the office or periods of financial uncertainty, can affect mood, desire, and hormone production.

Alleviating stress and worry can remove the distraction and help with being fully present and connected during intercourse.

Depression

A common, but less discussed, symptom of depression is erectile dysfunction. Depression and erectile dysfunction tangle together to make each one worse. Loss of self-esteem, disturbed sleep, poor eating, and overall fatigue are common symptoms of depression and all these contribute to a lack of interest and confirmation for feeling bad about oneself. Some anti-depressant medications also make impotence worse, which helps neither situation.

Relationship Concerns

If a man is not interested, due to over-familiarity or concerns within the relationship, it can contribute to libido problems. Likewise if there is confusion about sexual orientation, this underlying cause can affect desire leading to self-identity and esteem issues that ultimately run to erectile dysfunction.

Erectile Dysfunction can result from a Matrix of Emotions.

Erectile dysfunction can be anxiety-provoking and disorienting for any man at any age.

A common pattern in the emotional causes of erectile dysfunction is that they are self-perpetuating. The loss of erection, libido or desire, depression, and uncertain relationships create a vortex of self-doubt and hesitation that starts at the first thoughts of an upcoming sexual encounter.

Resolving the Emotional Vortex of Erectile Dysfunction

Emotional Resolution (EmRes) removes the emotional triggers that feed the self-doubt and hesitation. It also works on depression, stress and performance anxiety.

EmRes is an emerging technique that is uniquely positioned to help erectile dysfunction. During short one-on-one sessions with a profession, either in person, on the phone or via online meetings, the emotion that cloaks and guards a man’s erectile dysfunction is resolved and released.

There is no triggering, no personal information need be shared, and any original trauma does not need to be known or shared.

This is not sex therapy. 95% of the time, the session addresses the emotions leading up to the sexual encounter, not the encounter itself. We find that the limiting emotions occur well in advance, sometimes hours or more before, as the man envisions the upcoming interactions and starts to dwell on possible failure.

At this early stage, the root emotion to be tackled starts a crescendo of increasing fears, culminating in either failure during or avoiding the encounter altogether. By working at the start of the cascade, the scope of discussion is diminished, relieving the client of what can, in some cases, be a very uncomfortable conversation for him.

With this fear out of the way, more men step forward to reveal their anxieties and worries and resolve the emotions leading to erectile dysfunction.

Learn more about EmRes (link: https://www.emotionalhealthinstitute.org/emotional-resolution)

Are you ready to let go of the emotions that are wilting your performance?


Sue Siebens

Certified EmRes Practitioner

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